Bearings are a major part of mechanical equipment. Reducing rolling friction contributes to better performance, improves energy consumption, and prevents premature bearing failure. Proper bearing maintenance is essential to get the best out of equipment.

Damaged Bearings

There are numerous reasons bearings can fail, including: rust, overheating, wear, and fracturing. Improper lubrication causes 20% to 30% of bearing failures. Most of these issues can be avoided through correct lubrication process.

Common Causes of Bearing Failure

Lubricant

If the wrong lubricant is used for an application, including not being sufficiently durable for the operating conditions, it can contribute to bearing failure. A good lubricant can help prevent rust, reduce friction, and support optimal performance.

Dirt and Contamination

Lubricants can get contaminated by water, chemicals, or residue, as a result they perform less effectively in a bearing component. To avoid contamination, ensure regular maintenance of equipment is performed.

Oil Viscosity

Many engine bearing failures are caused by oil that is too heavy in viscosity. During cold temperatures, a heavy-weight oil will not flow or pump properly. When flow is limited, engine bearings become starved for lubrication and fail. To avoid failures, good-quality multi-viscosity engine oils have been developed to include “flowability” for low temperatures.

Premature bearing failure can be detected during scheduled inspections. This process will help reduce dirt and debris contamination and catch early wear patterns before a total failure. Contact Mechanical Power bearing experts and learn how to avoid problems related to bearing failures and proper lubrication techniques.

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